Quick Answer: What Is An Example Of A Complete Sentence?

What are the five parts of a complete sentence?

Five of the sections will include the five parts: Capital Letter, Subject Noun, Predicate Verb, Complete Thought, and Terminal Punctuation..

What is a complete sentence?

A complete sentence has to have a subject and a verb, and the verb has to be a “finite”: A sentence with its main verb in an ‘-ing’ form will not be a complete sentence. *Marge swimming. A sentence with its main verb in an infinitive form (“to” + verb) will not be a complete sentence.

What is an example of a complete subject in a sentence?

The complete subject is who or what is “doing” the verb, including any modifiers. Complete Subject Examples: The mangy old dog limped down the alley. In this sentence, the “dog” is “doing” the verb, “limped.”

Is OK a complete sentence?

In a compelte sentence, you need a Subject and a Predicate. But what about the sentences that are, “Okay.”, “Yes/No/Maybe”, “Hello.” etc.

What does every sentence need?

To be complete, every sentence must have a subject, a verb and a complete idea. The most simple sentence creates meaning with only a subject and a verb or verb phrase. For example: I like to read. (The subject is “I” and the verb phrase is “like to read.”)

What is a complete subject in English?

The complete subject is the simple subject and all the words that describe or explain it. The sentences below have the complete subject underlined once.

What comes after a complete subject?

Every sentence has two basic parts: the complete subject and the predicate. The complete subject contains the main noun in the sentence; the predicate contains the verb, or action, in the sentence. … The word ‘ballerinas’ is the simple subject, but the other three words modify, or describe, the ballerinas.

What is an example of an incomplete sentence?

A sentence fragment (also known as an incomplete sentence) is a sentence that’s missing a subject, a verb, or both. Here’s an example of a sentence fragment: On my way home. On my way home is a prepositional phrase. There’s no subject and no verb here, so this is an incomplete sentence.

Is why a complete sentence?

No, “Why?” is not considered a complete sentence in standard English grammar.

How do you write a complete sentence?

The aim in writing is always to write in complete sentences which are correctly punctuated. Sentences always begin with a capital letter and end in either a full stop, exclamation or question mark. A complete sentence always contains a verb, expresses a complete idea and makes sense standing alone.

Is I went a complete sentence?

Let’s look at some examples. I went to the store yesterday. The subject is “I” and the verb is “went,” and the sentence expresses a complete and independent thought.

Is going home a complete sentence?

“Want to go with?” vs. “Want to go with me?” But how would one “complete” a sentence like “Go home now.” Provided they’re grammatical imperatives, yes, they’re complete sentences. Imperatives and Interrogatives are different kinds of sentences, but not incomplete.

What’s the difference between a simple and a complete subject?

The simple subject is a single word representing the subject without any of its modifiers or adjectives whereas a complete subject represents the subject along with all of its modifiers or adjectives.