What Does The Fair Housing Act Do?

Landlords cannot treat a tenant adversely or unequally based on that tenants actual or perceived race, color, ancestry, national origin, place of birth, sex, age, religion, creed, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, source of income, weight, or height.

S.F., Cal., Police Code § 3304..

What landlords Cannot ask?

Therefore, a landlord cannot ask questions such as:Are you pregnant?What is your Gender?Do you plan to have (more) children?Are you married, single, or divorced?What is your ethnic background or religion?What is your sexual orientation?Do you receive public assistance?How old are you?More items…•

Can a landlord refuse to rent to a felon?

No matter how long ago your conviction may have been the landlord holds the right to deny you housing based on your past convictions. Not renting to a person with a felony is a rental standard designed to minimize the landlord’s liability risk. But it is important to note that all landlords may not feel this way.

Can a person with disabilities be evicted?

Disability. In general, a landlord cannot evict a person because they have a disability unless the disability is causing additional problems for the landlord or other tenants. … Some landlords may step in and try to get assistance for the tenant, but others for one reason or another will just simply evict.

What are the requirements of the Fair Housing Act?

The Fair Housing Act prohibits discrimination in the sale, rental, financing and insuring of dwellings on the basis of color, race, religion, sex, national origin, disability and familial status.

Who is exempt from Fair Housing Act?

The Fair Housing Act covers most housing. In some circumstances, the Act exempts owner-occupied buildings with no more than four units, single-family housing sold or rented without the use of a broker and housing operated by organizations and private clubs that limit occupancy to members.

Who investigates fair housing complaints?

Office of Fair Housing and Equal OpportunityStep 1: File a Complaint The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) enforces the FHA. HUD’s Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity (FHEO) is responsible for receiving and investigating fair housing complaints.

What are the characteristics of housing discrimination?

Specifically, the Fair Housing Act prohibits discrimination in housing on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status, or disability. This also applies to perceptions of such characteristics.

What are the 3 most common physical disabilities?

Key facts on physical disabilityCerebral palsy.Spinal cord injury.Amputation.Multiple sclerosis.Spina bifida.Musculoskeletal injuries (eg back injury)Arthritis.Muscular dystrophy.

How much can you sue for housing discrimination?

It’s fair to be angry and scared—the direct federal fines for violations of the Fair Housing Act are usually $17,000 per violation; total settlements on race, familial status, age and sex discrimination cases often reach well into the six figures—but those overwhelming emotions are why you should go straight to your …

What are the 4 types of discrimination?

Under the Equality Act 2010, there are four main types of discrimination. The four types of discrimination are direct discrimination, indirect discrimination, harassment and victimisation.

How much can I sue my landlord for?

You can sue for up to $5,000 in Small Claims Court, and you can only recover money for specific contractual or legal violations. If you have claims against your landlord for amounts totaling more than $5,000, you can try to file against them in a different court.

What are the top 10 disabilities?

Here are 10 of the most common conditions that are considered disabilities.Arthritis and other musculoskeletal problems. … Heart disease. … Lung or respiratory problems. … Mental illness, including depression. … Diabetes. … Stroke. … Cancer. … Nervous system disorders.More items…•

What qualifies as a disability under the Fair Housing Act?

The Fair Housing Act defines a person with a disability to include (1) individuals with a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities; (2) individuals who are regarded as having such an impairment; and (3) individuals with a record of such an impairment.